Intervention 1B Data

Intervention Data
Sequencing
Pre 1/20


Total
3
2
1
0
Shane
49
9
13
24
3
Suzie
46
6
12
23
3
Jen
26
5
9
10
2


Post 1/25


Total
3
2
1
0
Shane
46
16
17
12
1
Suzie
47
15
16
14
2
Jen
25
8
12
4
1


Strategies
· Use common graphic organizers
· Deconstruct prompts with students
· Use shorter text to practice identifying main idea
· With dates, determine what is significant and what is not




English 1A Wiki

SMART Goal:

The percentage of English 1A students scoring proficient or higher in the effective sequencing of events in a personal narrative will increase from 45% to 85% by the end of the first unit (drafts due October 8) as measured by the Write Source Personal Narrative Unit administered on October 8.


Common Teaching Strategies
1. Use of common terms for sequencing transitions
2. Use exemplars (good and bad from Write Source)
3. Use common graphic organizers for sequencing
4. Specific activity for use of imagery
Resources
1. Write Source book
2. A list of common transitions
3. Common Graphic Organizers
Processes
1. Brainstorming
2. Feedback on Prewriting
3. Check for understanding
4. Assessments (use of transitions, identifying sequences in professional pieces, etc)


September 22, 2010
IF (teacher behavior) - THEN (student behavior)


1. If teachers do a sensory detail activity, then students will have a better understanding of sensory details.

2. If teachers use a common sequencing graphic organizer, then students will have a visual representation of sequencing in a personal narrative.

3. If teachers provide exemplars of a personal narrative, then students will practice identifying sequencing in a narrative.

4. If teachers overtly teach transitions, then students will revise their drafts for transitions.



After collecting the personal narrative essays, we found that 93% of those who turned it in mastered the skill of sequencing events within a personal narrative.


October 27th
Agenda
· Norms
o Respect
o Timely info
o Collaborate
o Bring materials
· Analyze Data
o Pre-assessment
§ Identify theme (main idea) of text
§ Select 3 quotes that support the theme you selected
o Findings
§ Ss struggle with identifying a theme
§ Struggle with connecting textual evidence to theme
· If quotes pulled, not relevant to theme
· Determine Focus
o 6c: Read a given text, identify the theme, and provide support from the text
o Identify theme
o Select quotes from text that support theme and are relevant
· Design pre-assessment
o “Creating Our Own Happiness” text
o “Creating Our Own Happiness” theme identification document
o [supporting documents]


· Determine assessment date
o End of semester
o Use Write Source: Lit Analysis rubric
· Closure
o Use citation/quote collection document
o Use common outline and other resources
o Support in Literacy classes


Data Collection 2: 11/10/10

===||
|| # of Students || % of students proficient and above || % of students below proficient || || Harkness || 100 || 9 (9 students) || 91 (91 students) || || McArdle || 68 || 9.7 (7 students) || 90.3 (61 students) || || Philson || 101 || 10.1 (10 students) || 89.1 (91 students) || || Waters || 65 || 8.1 (8 students) || 91.9 (57 students) || || Total || 334 || 9.22 || 90.78 || ===

The percentage of English 1A students scoring proficient or higher in the ability to integrate textual evidence that relates to a given theme will increase from below 10% to 65% by December 8th as measured by a post assessment of introducing, citing, and explaining, graded with a rubric created by the 1A team, administered on December 8th.

Common Teaching Strategies
Instructional
· Use/provide common terms
o Themes
o Introduce, Cite, Explain
§ PowerPoint
· Common outline
· Common quote collection sheet
· In-Class activities geared around selecting appropriate quotes
o Explanation of each theme to ensure understanding – this will aide in the explanation of each quote
Resources
· Write Source
· PowerPoint of explanation
· Common graphic organizers
o Citation Collection Handout
o Outline
Processes
· Collaboration
· Feedback on pre-assessment
· Feedback on scaffolded points in the unit
o Outline for the Preface where students select quotes and explain how relates each to a thesis.

IF (teacher behavior) - THEN (student behavior)


1. If teachers model how to select appropriate quotes, then students will have a better understanding of choosing citations that apply to a given theme.

2. If teachers use a common outline/graphic organizer, then students will have a model/representation of organizing the explanation of a quote.

3. If teachers provide exemplars of ICE, then students will practice ICE with guidance.

4. If teachers overtly teach the process of introducing a quote, citing a quote, and explaining a quote, then students will independently complete the process correctly.